Impacts of no sugar (or) sugarfree foods for diabetes patients (facts u need to know)

No sugar, low sugar or sugarfree are some of the phrases which excite diabetes patients. When the physician says that you are detected with diabetes and avoid intake of sugar then cames the real craving for sugar-rich foods, so stopping sweets is not going to happen and we ended up with substitute names as sugar free for diabetes. Yes, it’s sugar-free which is also known as diabetic sweets, it is sweet and we are much happy about it. But it’s not as good as it sounds.

It’s not advised to take in a diabetic diet, patients better avoid that.

So here we can discuss

  • what is sugarfree is made up and how it affects diabetes and normal health

  • what are the artificial sweeteners available.

  • About natural sweeteners that substitute sugar and artificial sweeteners.

One 2016 survey saw normal-weight individuals who ate more artificial sweeteners were more likely to have diabetes than people who were overweight or obese.

One 2017 study in the Canadian medical association journal found that “consumption of nonnutritive sweeteners was associated with increases in weight and waist circumference and higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular events”.

Artificial sweeteners :

Sugar-free is always made of chemically manufactured molecules.

Aspartame

  • 200 times sweeter than sugar.

  • At high-temperature degenerate and leaves toxic chemicals.

  • Minimum 92 side effects.

  • Often termed as the most dangerous artificial sweetener.

  • Ability to increase Type 2 diabetes.

Sucrose

  • 600 times sweeter than sugar.

  • It can cause liver and kidney to enlarge.

  • Induce sugar cravings.

  • Increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  • Acesulfame:

  • 200 times sweeter than sugar.

  • Not yet sure about safety.

Sugar alcohols

Sugar alcohols sometimes are with carbohydrates which leads to an increase in blood sugar level. Some FDA approved sugar alcohols are:

  • Erythritol

  • Xylitol

  • Sorbitol

  • Lactitol

  • Isomalt

  • Maltitol

Effects over Diabetes:

Sugar-free sweets side effects are normally high and especially for diabetics patients its high.

Since consuming artificial sweeteners leads to weight gain and depression which are the main reason for diabetes.

Artificial sweeteners make a food way for Type 2 diabetes.

Many low sugar foods or sugar-free foods has carbohydrates and starch which leads to an increase in blood sugar level.

Natural substitutes

As a diabetes patient, we are in searching for substitutes for sugar rather than having foods with no sugar, for this our nature came with some good quality amount of alternatives.

  • yacon syrup

  • Coconut sugar

  • Honey

  • Maple sugar

  • Molasses

Despite not providing sugar, the sugar-free red bull may still increase your risk of type 2 diabetes if consumed regularly.

The positive side of using these products is there are no calories in it but they are chemicals.

The center for science in the public interest currently deems artificial sweeteners a product to “avoid”. Avoid, means the product is unsafe or poorly tested and not worth any risk

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